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2018 Winter Intensive
Event on 2018-01-05 17:30:00
Come and experience dancing at its best with three days of classes taught by 8&1 company members and friends. Some of DFW's most innovative teachers gather for a weekend full of disciplined technique classes and inspiring choreography. Bring your passion and energy! Get ready to work and sweat with 8&1 Dallas!Classes are designed to celebrate the freedom of movement and the expression of emotion, disciplined by work ethic and training. We encourage students to ask questions and push themselves to new levels.Student safety is very important to us! If a student must miss a class or leave the premises for any reason during the blocked intensive hours, and is under the age of 18, we must be notified in advance by a parent or guardian. For up-to-date workshop class schedule visit 8and1Dance.com/intensive! Schedule subject to change! What to bring: Please make sure to bring plenty of water and healthy snacks. It will be a very challenging weekend and we want to make sure we are taking good care of our bodies with proper nutrition and hydration. We will also be sending over two documents to you via email. Students over 18 and parents/guardians of minors-please sign and scan (or snap a pic!) and email back to us OR print and bring to the intensive with you on Friday Jan 5th. Students must have signed paperwork in order to partake in classes.Dress Code: There is no specific dress code required for our intensive, however we recommend dancers dress in appropriate form fitting attire for technique classes so we can easily see and correct student alignment and body positioning. During warm ups, any baggy clothing or excessive jewelry will be asked to be removed.Hip Hop: Baggy clothing and street shoes are acceptable!Shoes: Dancers are encouraged to bring appropriate dance shoes for each genre of dance, however if they do not they WILL STILL BE PERMITTED to participate. Photography: We will have 8&1's professional photographer, Sarah Beal onsite throughout the weekend. All Photos can be viewed at Sarah Beal’s website Sarahbealphotos.com. NO PERSONAL CAMERAS OR VIDEO WILL BE ALLOWED.Yoga: Please bring a mat or towel. Audition: AN OPEN AUDITION WILL BE HELD AT 7pm on SUNDAY 1/7 …THIS AUDITION IS AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS AGES 12+ FOR OUR APPRENTICE PROGRAM AND PROFESSIONALS AGES 17+ FOR OUR PROFESSIONAL COMPANY, BUT IS NOT REQUIRED.More information on apprenticeship and company positions will be provided upon casting.Students who are taking the intensive will not be judged during their classes, so please do not feel nervous or like it is part of the audition. IT IS NOT! We look forward to seeing you there! If you have any questions please direct them to 8&1 dance company and not Rowlett Dance Academy. Feel free to contact me directly at jsrucciny@gmail.com or through 8and1dance.com. The workshop will be held at Rowlett Dance Academy: 8405 Lake View Parkway, Rowlett, TX 75088SEE YOU SOON! students intermediate ages 9-13 – 5.00 Student advanced ages 13-adult – 5.00 Student intermediate ages 13-adult – 5.00 students advanced ages 9-13 – 5.00

at Rowlett Dance
8405 lake view parkway
Rowlett, United States

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Dallas 2018 Career Fair. Get hired!
Event on 2018-04-23 10:00:00
Meet face to face with top employers hiring for Sales, Customer Service,  Retail, Financial Services, Management, I.T. and Government positions. If you have been looking for a new career or just ready to start a new job you don't want to miss this exciting hiring event.  Professional Dress is required and please bring additional copies of your resume. What to expect at a Nationwide Career Fair?  Multiple employers hiring for open positions.  Great networking opportunities in a relaxed, professional environment. Face to face meetings with recruiters, managers and human resources professionals from local and Fortune 500 companies. 100% free event to attend. Register to receive a full list of attending employers and job updates in your city: http://www.nationwidecareerfairs.com/candidates/

at Clarion
4440 West Airport Freeway
Irving, United States

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Psychic Night with Cheryl Andrea!
Event on 2018-01-26 19:00:00
Two Corks and a Bottle, a custom winery and wine bar in Uptown Dallas, is happy to announce that Cheryl Andrea, will join us from 7:00 pm – 11:00 pm on the second & fourth Fridays of every month!  Cheryl is a clairvoyant, medium and intuitive visionary, of The Dallas Psychic Fair fame! These wi[…]

214-871-9463

at Two Corks and a Bottle
2800 Routh Street
Dallas, United States

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Tatort-Dinner – Der Dallas Mord
Event on 2018-01-27 00:00:00

at Hotel-Restaurant Beckmannshof
Berliner Straße 39
Bochum, Germany

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Ted Conover, Author of “Immersion”
Event on 2018-01-25 14:00:00
Ted Conover, author of Immersion: A Writer’s Guide to Going Deep, will describe his practice of immersive journalism, where writers learn their subjects by placing themselves in the world of their subjects for a time. Ted Conover teaches journalism at the Arthur L. Carter School of Journalism at New York University. His books include Rolling Nowhere: Riding the Rails with America's Hoboes (1984); Coyotes: A Journey Across Borders with America's Illegal Migrants (1987); Whiteout: Lost in Aspen (1991); Newjack: Guarding Sing Sing (2000); and The Routes of Man: Travels in the Paved World (2010). Conover describes his journey as a writer: “I feel lucky to do what I do. I write about real people, often by living their lives for a while-visiting their lives, you might say. Trying them on for size. Though there are easier ways to make a living, I suppose, none strike me as a fraction so interesting. My first real adventures were cross-country bicycle rides, and a summer’s work in a sausage factory in Pamplona, Spain. During time off from college, I did community organizing in Dallas as a VISTA volunteer. Then came riding the rails (Rolling Nowhere), which originated as another escape from college, but doubled as research for a senior anthropology thesis. A transcendant moment occurred in a freight yard in Bakersfield, California, where, as I spoke with a guy my age named Enrique Jarra, it dawned on me that Mexican illegals were the true, modern-day incarnation of the classic American hobo. Coyotes, my second book, recounts a year of work and travel with these men. A smart guy I met in New York (he now edits the New Yorker magazine) introduced me at a party as a writer who “made a living sleeping on the ground,” which got me thinking and led me to Aspen and Whiteout, a very different sort of first-person ethnography. And then came Newjack, an account of immersion in a world that is tough and dangerous and–if a person’s not careful–soul-shrinking. That research was my hardest ever, but also paid an enduring dividend of knowledge.” Co-sponsored by the Campus Climate Council, the Program in Literary Journalism, the Department of Criminology, Law and Society, the Center for Law, Culture, and Society, and the Forum for the Academy and the Public.

at University of California, Irvine
Student Center
Irvine, United States

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Air Force Falcons at Dallas Baptist Patriots Baseball
Event on 2018-03-03 14:00:00

at Dallas Baptist University – Horner Ballpark
3000 Mountain Creek Parkway
Dallas, United States

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PARKING: American Airlines Center – Dallas Stars v Toronto
Event on 2018-01-25 19:30:00

at American Airlines Center
2500 Victory Avenue
Dallas, United States

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Andris Nelsons leads Mahler’s Symphony No. 3 featuring mezzo-soprano Susan Graham
Event on 2018-01-19 13:30:00
The outstanding American mezzo Susan Graham joins Andris Nelsons, the BSO, and the women of the Tanglewood Festival Chorus for Mahler's Third Symphony, which, along with his Symphony No. 2, exemplifies the composer's ambitious expansion of the symphonic genre. This is the second of Mahler's trio of "Wunderhorn" symphonies (Nos. 2-4) employing text from the folk-poetry collection Des Knaben Wunderhorn. The six-movement symphony is divided into two parts. Part I is a massive, 30-plus-minute opening movement representing a Bacchic procession celebrating the arrival of summer. Part II (movements 2 through 6) is a series of character pieces representing the responses of, in turn, wild flowers, animals of the forest, mankind itself, angels, and the spirit of love. View biography in full page >

In 2017-18, his fourth season as the BSO's Ray and Maria Stata Music Director, Andris Nelsons leads the Boston Symphony Orchestra in twelve wide-ranging subscription programs at Symphony Hall, repeating three of them at New York's Carnegie Hall in March. Also this season, in November, he and the orchestra tour Japan together for the first time, playing concerts in Nagoya, Osaka, Kawasaki, and Tokyo. In addition, in February 2018 Maestro Nelsons becomes Gewandhauskapellmeister of the Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, in which capacity he will bring both orchestras together for a unique multi-dimensional alliance; under his direction, the BSO celebrates its first "Leipzig Week in Boston" that same month. In the summer of 2015, following his first season as music director, Andris Nelsons' contract with the Boston Symphony Orchestra was extended through the 2021-22 season. Following the 2015 Tanglewood season, he and the BSO undertook a twelve-concert, eight-city tour to major European capitals as well as the Lucerne, Salzburg, and Grafenegg festivals. A second European tour, to eight cities in Germany, Austria, and Luxembourg, took place in May 2016.

The fifteenth music director in the history of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Andris Nelsons made his BSO debut at Carnegie Hall in March 2011, his Tanglewood debut in July 2012, and his BSO subscription series debut in January 2013. His first CD with the BSO-live recordings of Wagner's Tannhäuser Overture and Sibelius's Symphony No. 2-was released in November 2014 on BSO Classics. April 2017 brought the release on BSO Classics of the four Brahms symphonies with Maestro Nelsons conducting, recorded live at Symphony Hall in November 2016. In an ongoing, multi-year collaboration with Deutsche Grammophon initiated in 2014-15, he and the BSO are making live recordings of Shostakovich's complete symphonies, the opera Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk, and other works by the composer. The first release in this series (the Symphony No. 10 and the Passacaglia from Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk) won the 2016 Grammy Award for Best Orchestral Performance and Gramophone Magazine's Orchestral Award. The second release (symphonies 5, 8, and 9, plus excerpts from Shostakovich's 1932 incidental music to Hamlet) won the 2017 Grammy for Best Orchestral Performance. Also for Deutsche Grammophon, Andris Nelsons is recording the Bruckner symphonies with the Gewandhausorchester Leipzig and the Beethoven symphonies with the Vienna Philharmonic.

In 2017-18, Andris Nelsons is artist-in-residence at the Konzerthaus Dortmund and continues his regular collaboration with the Vienna Philharmonic, leading that orchestra on tour to China. He also maintains regular collaborations with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra of Amsterdam, the Berlin Philharmonic, the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, and the Philharmonia Orchestra. Maestro Nelsons has also been a regular guest at the Bayreuth Festival and at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, where he conducts a new David Alden production of Lohengrin this season.

Born in Riga in 1978 into a family of musicians, Andris Nelsons began his career as a trumpeter in the Latvian National Opera Orchestra before studying conducting. He was music director of the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra from 2008 to 2015, principal conductor of the Nordwestdeutsche Philharmonie in Herford, Germany, from 2006 to 2009, and music director of Latvian National Opera from 2003 to 2007. Mr. Nelsons is the subject of a 2013 DVD from Orfeo, a documentary film entitled "Andris Nelsons: Genius on Fire." View biography in full page >

Susan Graham – hailed as "an artist to treasure" by the New York Times  – rose to the highest echelon of international performers within just a few years of her professional debut, mastering an astonishing range of repertoire and genres along the way. Her operatic roles span four centuries, from Monteverdi's Poppea to Sister Helen Prejean in Jake Heggie's Dead Man Walking, which was written especially for her. She won a Grammy Award for her collection of Ives songs, and her recital repertoire is so broad that 14 composers from Purcell to Sondheim are represented on her most recent Onyx album, Virgins, Vixens & Viragos. This distinctly American artist has also been recognized throughout her career as one of the foremost exponents of French vocal music. Although a native of Texas, she was awarded the French government's prestigious "Chevalier de la Légion d'Honneur," both for her popularity as a performer in France and in honor of her commitment to French music.

To launch the 2017-18 season, Ms. Graham will reprise her star turn in the title role of Susan Stroman's production of Lehár's The Merry Widow at the MET, then she joins Nathan Gunn for Bernstein's Trouble in Tahiti at Lyric Opera of Chicago, in a special concert to mark the composer's 100th birthday. To conclude the operatic season, she returns to Opera Theatre of Saint Louis opposite James Morris in Marc Blitzstein's 1948 opera Regina. At the Boston Symphony, she joins Charles Dutoit for Berlioz's La Damnation de Faust and Andris Nelsons for Mahler's Third Symphony, which is also the vehicle for her summer collaborations at the Tanglewood Festival and later on tour in Europe. Besides reuniting with Dutoit for Ravel's Shéhérazade at the San Francisco Symphony, she headlines a gala concert to celebrate Tulsa Opera's 70th anniversary. She also gives solo recitals at Emory University and Washington University, and rounds out the season with a night of cabaret at the Park Avenue Armory in New York.

Last season, Graham partnered with Renée Fleming for the San Francisco Symphony's opening-night gala, and joined Anna Netrebko, Plácido Domingo, and a host of other stars to celebrate the Metropolitan Opera's five decades at Lincoln Center. Having created the role of Sister Helen Prejean in the world premiere production of Dead Man Walking  at San Francisco Opera, she reprised her role in Washington National Opera's revival of the piece. She returned to Santa Fe Opera as Prince Orlofsky in a new production of Johann Strauss II's Die Fledermaus, and reprised her signature portrayal of Dido in Berlioz's Les Troyens at the Lyric Opera of Chicago. Concert highlights included selections from Mahler's Des Knaben Wunderhornat Carnegie Hall and Canteloube's Chants d'Auvergne with the Philadelphia Orchestra, as well as a star-studded Der Rosenkavalier at the Boston Symphony. She gave U.S. recitals of "Frauenliebe und -leben Variations," her program inspired by the Schumann song cycle, and expanded her discography with Nonesuch Records' DVD/Blu-ray release of William Kentridge's new treatment of Berg's Lulu, which captured her role debut as Countess Geschwitz at the Met.

Graham's earliest operatic successes were in such trouser roles as Cherubino in Mozart's Le nozze di Figaro. Her technical expertise soon brought mastery of Mozart's more virtuosic roles, like Sesto in La clemenza di Tito, Idamante in Idomeneo and Cecilio in Lucio Silla, as well as the title roles of Handel's Ariodante and Xerxes. She went on to triumph in two iconic Richard Strauss mezzo roles, Octavian in Der Rosenkavalier and the Composer in Ariadne auf Naxos. These brought her to prominence on all the world's major opera stages, including the Met, Lyric Opera of Chicago, San Francisco Opera, Covent Garden, Paris Opera, La Scala, Bavarian State Opera, Vienna State Opera and the Salzburg Festival, among many others. She performed the leading ladies in the MET world premieres of John Harbison's The Great Gatsby  and Tobias Picker's An American Tragedy, and made her Dallas Opera debut as Tina in a new production of The Aspern Papers by Dominick Argento. As Houston Grand Opera's Lynn Wyatt Great Artist, she starred as Prince Orlofsky in the company's first staging of Die Fledermaus in 30 years, before heading an all-star cast as Sycorax in the Met's Baroque pastiche The Enchanted Island  and making her rapturously received musical theater debut in a new production of Rodgers & Hammerstein's The King and I at the Théâtre du Châtelet in Paris.

It was in an early Lyon production of Berlioz's Béatrice et Bénédict that Graham scored particular raves from the international press, and a triumph in the title role of Massenet's Chérubin  at Covent Garden sealed her operatic stardom. Further invitations to collaborate on French music were forthcoming from many preeminent conductors, including Sir Colin Davis, Charles Dutoit, James Levine and Seiji Ozawa. New productions of Gluck's Iphigénie en Tauride, Berlioz's La damnation de Faust  and Massenet's Werther  were mounted for the mezzo in New York, London, Paris, Chicago, San Francisco and beyond. She recently made title role debuts in Offenbach's comic masterpieces La belle Hélène and The Grand Duchess of Gerolstein at Santa Fe Opera, as well as proving herself the standout star of the Met's star-studded revival of Les Troyens, which was broadcast live to cinema audiences worldwide in the company's celebrated "Live in HD" series. Graham's affinity for French repertoire has not been limited to the opera stage, having also served as the foundation for her extensive concert and recital career. Such great cantatas and symphonic song cycles as Berlioz's La mort de Cléopâtreand Les nuits d'été, Ravel's Shéhérazade and Chausson's Poème de l'amour et de la mer  provide opportunities for collaborations with the world's leading orchestras, and she makes regular appearances with the New York Philharmonic, Boston Symphony, Orchestre de Paris and London Symphony Orchestra.

Graham's distinguished discography features all the works described above, as well as a series of lauded solo albums, including Un frisson français, a program of French song recorded with pianist Malcolm Martineau for Onyx; C'est ça la vie, c'est ça l'amour!, an album of 20th-century operetta rarities on Erato; and La Belle Époque, an award-winning collection of songs by Reynaldo Hahn with pianist Roger Vignoles, from Sony Classical. Among the mezzo's numerous honors are Musical America's Vocalist of the Year and an Opera News Award; Gramophone magazine has dubbed her "America's favorite mezzo." View biography in full page >

Tanglewood Festival Chorus
James Burton, BSO Choral Director and Conductor of the Tanglewood Festival Chorus
John Oliver, Founder and Conductor Laureate

This season at Symphony Hall, the Tanglewood Festival Chorus joins the Boston Symphony Orchestra for performances of Mahler's Symphony No. 3 (January 18-20) and Schumann's Nachtlied and Neujahrslied (February 8-10) under BSO Music Director Andris Nelsons; Grieg's incidental music to Peer Gynt under BSO Associate Conductor Ken-David Masur (October 19-24); Berlioz's The Damnation of Faust (October 26-28) and Ravel's complete Daphnis et Chloé (February 15-17) under Charles Dutoit, and Leonard Bernstein's Symphony No. 3, Kaddish, under Giancarlo Guerrero (March 15-17). Members of the chorus also participated in this season's all-Bernstein program on Opening Night. Originally formed under the joint sponsorship of Boston University and the Boston Symphony Orchestra, the all-volunteer Tanglewood Festival Chorus was established in 1970 by its founding conductor John Oliver, who stepped down from his leadership position with the TFC at the end of the 2014 Tanglewood season. Awarded the Tanglewood Medal by the BSO to honor his forty-five years of service to the ensemble, Mr. Oliver now holds the lifetime title of Founder and Conductor Laureate and occupies the Donald and Laurie Peck Master Teacher Chair at the Tanglewood Music Center. In February 2017, having prepared the chorus for that month's BSO performances of Bach's B minor Mass led by Andris Nelsons, the British-born James Burton was named the new Conductor of the Tanglewood Festival Chorus, also being appointed to the newly created position of BSO Choral Director.

Though first established for performances at the BSO's summer home, the Tanglewood Festival Chorus was soon playing a major role in the BSO's subscription season as well as BSO concerts at Carnegie Hall. Now numbering more than 300 members, the ensemble performs year-round with the Boston Symphony and Boston Pops. It has performed with Seiji Ozawa and the BSO in Hong Kong and Japan, and with the BSO in Europe under James Levine and Bernard Haitink, also giving a cappella  concerts of its own on the two latter occasions. The TFC made its debut in April 1970, in a BSO performance of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony with Leonard Bernstein conducting. Its first recording with the orchestra, Berlioz's La Damnation of Faust  with Seiji Ozawa, received a Grammy nomination for Best Choral Performance of 1975. The TFC has since made dozens of recordings with the BSO and Boston Pops, with James Levine, Seiji Ozawa, Bernard Haitink, Sir Colin Davis, Leonard Bernstein, Keith Lockhart, and John Williams. In August 2011, with John Oliver conducting and soloist Stephanie Blythe, the TFC gave the world premiere of Alan Smith's An Unknown Sphere  for mezzo-soprano and chorus, commissioned by the BSO for the ensemble's 40th anniversary. Its most recent recordings on BSO Classics, all drawn from live performances, include a disc of a cappella  music led by John Oliver and released to mark the TFC's 40th anniversary; and, with James Levine conducting, Ravel's complete Daphnis and Chlo?? (a 2009 Grammy-winner for Best Orchestral Performance), Brahms's German Requiem, and William Bolcom's Eighth Symphony for chorus and orchestra (a BSO 125th Anniversary Commission). Besides their work with the BSO, TFC members have performed Beethoven's Ninth Symphony with Zubin Mehta and the Israel Philharmonic; participated in a Saito Kinen Festival production of Britten's Peter Grimes  under Seiji Ozawa in Japan, and sang Verdi's Requiem with Charles Dutoit to help close a month-long International Choral Festival given in and around Toronto. The ensemble had the honor of singing at Sen. Edward Kennedy's funeral; has performed with the Boston Pops for the Boston Red Sox and Boston Celtics; and can be heard on the soundtracks of Clint Eastwood's Mystic River, John Sayles's Silver City, and Steven Spielberg's Saving Private Ryan. TFC members regularly commute from the greater Boston area, western Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont, and Maine, and TFC alumni frequently return each summer from as far away as Florida and California to sing with the chorus at Tanglewood. Throughout its history, the TFC has established itself as a favorite of conductors, soloists, critics, and audiences alike. View biography in full page >

James Burton was appointed Conductor of the Tanglewood Festival Chorus, and to the new position of BSO Choral Director, in February 2017. Born in London, Mr. Burton began his training at the Choir of Westminster Abbey, where he became head chorister. He was a choral scholar at St. John's College, Cambridge, and holds a master's degree in orchestral conducting from the Peabody Conservatory, where he studied with Frederik Prausnitz and Gustav Meier. He has conducted concerts with the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic, the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, the Hallé, the Orchestra of Scottish Opera, Royal Northern Sinfonia, BBC Concert Orchestra, and Manchester Camerata; in early 2016 he made his debut with the Orquestra Sinfònica Nacional with concerts in the Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City. Opera credits include Don Giovanni and La bohème at English National Opera, Così fan tutte at English Touring Opera, The Magic Flute at Garsington, and Gianni Schicchi and Suor Angelica at the Prague Summer Nights Festival. He has served on the music staff of the Metropolitan Opera, Opéra de Paris, English National Opera, Opera Rara, and Garsington Opera, where he was honored with the Leonard Ingrams Award in 2008. He has also conducted in London's West End and led a UK tour of Bernstein's Wonderful Town in 2012. His extensive choral conducting has included guest invitations with professional choirs including the Gabrieli Consort, the Choir of the Enlightenment, Wroc?aw Philharmonic, and the BBC Singers, with whom he performed at the Dubai Opera house in its inaugural season earlier this year. From 2002 to 2009 he served as choral director at the Hallé Orchestra, where he was music director of the Hallé Choir and founding conductor of the Hallé Youth Choir, winning the Gramophone Choral Award in 2009. He returned to Manchester in 2014, preparing the choirs for a Grammy-nominated recording under Sir Mark Elder of Vaughan Williams's Sea Symphony. From 2002 to 2017 he was music director of the chamber choir Schola Cantorum of Oxford, touring all over the world and recording with Hyperion Records. He collaborates regularly with leading young musicians and in 2017 appeared as guest director of the National Youth Choir of Japan and the Princeton University Glee Club, as well as the Genesis Sixteen. He teaches conducting, and has given master classes at the Royal Academy of Music and the Royal Welsh College of Music. In 2011 he founded a conducting scholarship with Schola Cantorum of Oxford. His compositions and arrangements have been performed internationally, and his orchestral arrangements for Arlo Guthrie have been performed by the Boston Pops, by many other leading U.S. orchestras, and at the Kennedy Center and Carnegie Hall. His commissions have included the music for the 2010 World Equestrian Games opening ceremony, a setting for chorus and orchestra of Thomas Hardy's The Convergence of the Twain commemorating the 100th anniversary of the Titanic disaster, and a recent Christmas carol premiered by the Choir of St. John's College, Cambridge, live on BBC Radio 3. His choral works are published by Edition Peters. As BSO Choral Director and Conductor of the Tanglewood Festival Chorus, James Burton occupies the Alan J. and Suzanne W. Dworsky Chair, endowed in perpetuity.

at Symphony Hall
334 Massachusetts Ave
Boston, United States

FMDallas

The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership – 5 Week Mastermind Group (Online Workshop)
Event on 2018-01-02 19:00:00
Are you willing to invest 5 weeks to educate yourself to become a better leader? No matter where you are in the leadership process, this Virtual Mastermind Group will help you become a better leader. Each law is your blueprint to success as a leader and when incorporated, they will help you influence and inspire those you lead or desire to lead. REGISTER TODAY! – That’s a week for a priceless experience. This training meets 5 times. Attendees are expected to attend all 5 sessions to raise their leadership lid and to increase their organizational influence.Tue, Dec 5, 2017 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM ESTTue, Dec 12, 2017 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM ESTTue, Dec 19, 2017 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM ESTTue, Dec 26, 2017 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM ESTTue, Jan 2, 2018 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM EST The Bottom Line in Leadership Isn't How Far We Advance Ourselves, but How Far We Advance Others For more information, visit: www.anderson.training/21Laws For more virtual training opportunites, visit: www.actnow.training

at Dallas, Texas, United States
Dallas, Texas, United States
Dallas, United States

FMDallas


by dmott9

When we look out into the world it is rather apparent that there is great sorrow and suffering throughout every country and every nation. No one is immune to the suffering of this life. The old and young are caught up in this misery of life.  The poor and the rich alike are caught in this same darkness and gloom. Both men and women of every race are in the hands of sorrow. We are suffering from the mental agony of misery and the psychological pain of loneliness that plagues nearly every human being on this earth. 
 
Without knowing ourselves we remain in sorrow and continue to live in our own delusions of hope for the future. If we belong to a particular religion or belief then we congregate and hide our sorrow among each other. Through such pretense, sorrow remains. We are forever hoping we will miraculously change tomorrow without transforming our lives today. If we plant the seeds of sorrow in our everyday lives, how can we expect compassion to spring forth within us tomorrow? Through confusion we expect wisdom to manifest in our existence while we continue doing the same old things as before. 
 
So we must ask ourselves the deepest questions without the intention of getting the same old answers. Why do we not face the facts of our life of sorrow, here and now? The not facing our state of being in sorrow is what keeps us continuously living in such loneliness and despair. We fail to look and see the actualities of our lives and continue down the same paths that leads nowhere. Because it has been tried does not mean it is true. All the various world religions have made us promises of a better tomorrow if we adhere to their doctrines. Promises they themselves have not fulfilled. We are expected to continue on such paths which lead nowhere. In light of the fact none of their answers have produced any lasting change in the heart of man. We are still suffering and we are still filled with sadness, misery and disharmony. All the religious and political leaders have failed to deliver on their promises. Why is it, we do not hold such ignorance accountable? We must seek the truth within ourselves. In truth, we are all responsible for this life of discontent.
 
The religions throughout the world from Christianity in the west and Islam in the east, have propounded their solutions for many centuries to no effect. We are still trapped in sorrow with no clear way out. And if you are at all a serious human being, you will see their solutions to our problems are nowhere to be found. 
 
The burning fires of sorrow are within us and all around us. The face of sorrow continues to be a major problem throughout the whole of humanity. The unhappiness produced by ignorance and fear continues to haunt us day and night. All the prevailing sorrow continues to escalate and torment us from within our consciousness. The darkness of suffering expresses itself outwardly into the world. This problem of sorrow must be given deep thought. And if we are at all serious, we must go beyond thought and its waywardness. We claim we see the outcome of its ailments but fail to act and respond, efficiently. We try in various ways to cure our problems while in actuality we are only treating the symptoms through escape.  The fact of sorrow we never face. This causes our problems to perpetuate and corrode our daily lives.
 
Through tradition we are so attached to our ideals and beliefs that prevents us from seeing. We look but we do not see. Never realizing that in the power of seeing there is freedom. Instead we merely look in partiality which leaves us in obscurity. In effect, we never discover the truth of anything. Only to find ourselves moving from one illusion into another. Not only in the religious world but in the world of politics as well. We support one political campaign that promise hope and change only to lead us in a different scheme of corruption all the same. 
 
So in the darkness of sorrow we move from one state into another god-forsaken place. Psychologically, we travel from one prison into another that has a little more space, a little more provisions and promises to pacify us for the time being. The powers that be lay out a plan for us to follow in the idea that it will bring us to a utopia on earth or a dream land in the heavens. They all proclaim someday we will find a better way to live and treat each other. But, time and time again this same routine of thought and reason has failed all of mankind. The fact is we are still suffering, exponentially. 
 
Psychologically, as human beings we are never free. Without the realization and clarity of intelligence, there is no understanding which breeds freedom. In freedom there is no choice. We choose because we do not see. Without seeing clearly, we repeat the same old things that have not brought about any fundamental change. 
 
In spirituality, seeing is complete action devoid of choice, thought and its traditions. The power of seeing is the glory within that brings light to all our emotional and psychological problems. When at once we are empty of ourselves then we can be fulfilled and unchained by sorrow. The moment we end all conscious effort and action born of thought, the creative power of love enters and illumines our whole being. This illumination is love which burns away all sorrow and all suffering. And in the radiance of this love, there is exquisite beauty in which words can not touch or describe. This joyous love transcends the consciousness of mind and the idea of ego. 
 
In the absence and emptiness of all your sorrow, this glorious love comes unsought. There is no means of willing this love into being. No tricks, no prayer or any form of conjuring can call this into existence. It is the totality of all life. Being whole, it has the power to heal all our problems, holistically. 
 
When this spiritual love comes, there is no self-centered ego within you to take hold of it. It is incorruptible. It comes when you are vacant. It comes when you are not conscious of yourself. This creative love lives in each moment in which man as thought can not enter. 
 
Only a fool will deliberately walk through this door within to be stripped of him self. It takes a great fool to open himself up for this to enter the temple of his being. Such a being is summoned by compassion for the sake of the world and all its sorrow. Seeing there is no other answer, he see what must be done and turns within. Unmoved by superficial solutions to the world crisis and all the suffering in and around him. Without choice he takes a single step into the doorway marked by death. Come what may; know there is no other way. One must enter this living death to discover eternal love that has the power to solve all our fundamental problems.
 
As a human being, we must see that all efforts within the field of knowledge, faith and reason have failed humanity. None of the religions or beliefs has solved our human dilemma. So man must turn within himself.  Not out of ignorance but understanding. Through negation and psychological death, man discovers he is not the ego that is identified with the flesh. He must discover he is nothing. We must all discover that exquisite love and affection which can solve our psychological problems of consciousness. 
 
When at once you enter death, all will be clear. In this clarity you discover this empty-fullness within. Then you will understand what love is. This perfect love takes you by surprise and fills you completely.  This love which awakens within you was never born and never created. It is eternity devoid of time. It is the fulfillment that can not be spoken. What words can paint a picture that could give understanding to another of this glorious revelation? No amount of words, no matter how eloquent, can describe this immensity. It is the beauty of unwritten poetry in which you must see within. This love is inexpressible joy.
 
Spiritually, we must all discover this truth within ourselves.  Then we may live in the light of intelligence beyond the shadows of darkness and sorrow. And only then will we create a holy and harmonious life on earth. Not tomorrow, but here and now. A life in which you live in the freedom of eternal love.

Adonis Alexander is a Spiritual Teacher who resides in the United States.

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