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maroc #2

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Some cool maroc images:

maroc #2
maroc
Image by j. adolph

Couleurs de la rue, Moulay Driss Zerhoun, province de Meknès, Maroc.
maroc
Image by byb64
Moulay Driss Zerhoun est la ville sainte du Maroc, c’est là qu’est enterré Idriss Ier (745-791) , fondateur de Fès et de la première dynastie musulmane du Maroc : les Idrissides.

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Sketch Level 1 Student Showcase (Nick’s Class)
Event on 2017-12-10 17:30:00
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at DALLAS COMEDY HOUSE LLC
3025 Main St.
Dallas, United States

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PRYME BAR SATURDAYS @ PRYME BAR DALLAS
Event on 2017-12-02 21:00:00
Perception Saturdays @ Pryme Dallas 2 Level Ultimate Party Experience ????????????? ? Every Saturday Night ? Pryme Dallas ? 10333 Technology Blvd. Dallas, TX ? 8:00pm-2:00am ? Self + Valet Parking is Available ????????????? ? .00 Drinks before 10:00pm ? Hookah Specials All Night ? Kitchen Open til 1:00am ? Karaoke on the Patio ? VIP Tables and Bottle Service Available ????????????? ? Free Admission before 11:00pm ? 0.00 Table Only ? 0.00 Table w/ Champagne ? 0.00 Table w/ Premium Liquor & Champagne ? Early Arrival Highly Suggested ????????????? Dress Code Enforced | Early Arrival Suggested For more information call/text 214.612.3236

at Pryme Bar Dallas
10333 Technology Boulevard West
Dallas, United States

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A few nice led tv images I found:

Glastonmudbury
led tv
Image by brizzle born and bred
Weather forecast for Glastonbury Festival 2014: It’s going to rain (like it does every year) Glastonbury Festival: revellers put on a brave face as mud returns

It wouldn’t be the same without it.

Mud, mud, glorious mud and rainsodden tents – thanks to hailstones and lightning storms which hit the festival last night during the first top acts.

Canadian rockers Arcade Fire headlined the Pyramid stage during a heavy downpour while Rudimental were forced to cut short their set due to an electrical storm.

Music on all outside stages – and many inside ones – was suspended as the storm hit late in the afternoon.

The cloudburst lasted more than an hour and organisers took the decision within minutes to close the stages, as some festivalgoers took cover to escape torrential rain and hailstones.

The thunderstorm began at around 5pm, but the rain did not start for another 20 minutes.

By 6.45pm the storm had passed and the music started once again.

Early estimates indicate that around half an inch of rain fell on the festival site in less than an hour, turning the vast areas of Worthy Farm into a mudbath.

It is the first time in many years that an electrical storm has stopped the entertainment in mid-flow.

The cloudburst lasted more than an hour and organisers took the decision within minutes to close the stages, as some festivalgoers took cover to escape torrential rain and hailstones.

It is the first time in many years that an electrical storm has stopped the entertainment in mid-flow.

The thunderstorm began at around 5pm, but the rain did not start for another 20 minutes.

By 6.45pm the storm had passed and the music started once again.

Early estimates indicate that around half an inch of rain fell on the festival site in less than an hour, turning the vast areas of Worthy Farm into a mudbath.

It is the first time in many years that an electrical storm has stopped the entertainment in mid-flow.

The downpours led to woodchips being spread over large parts of the Glastonmudbury site to soak up waterlogged fields.

The muddiest year was in 1997 when 78mm of rain fell eight out of nine days in the run-up to the event.

Glastonbury over the years

WHEN a few hundred hippies gathered in a field near Glastonbury in 1970 no one could have envisaged that they were witnessing the birth of the world’s largest open-air music festival. It was the day after Jimi hendrix died and the £1 admission cost included milk from the nearby dairy farm.

Organisers unwittingly enlisted the local hell’s Angels chapter to handle security but they are said to have made off with the ox roast.

Although memories of that first Glastonbury are now hazy it is widely accepted that a Bristol rock band called Stackridge has the distinction of being the first to perform at this now legendary festival.

As Glastonbury celebrates its 40th anniversary later this month more than 170,000 people, the equivalent of the population of Peterborough, will descend on this beautiful corner of Somerset for the latest four-day extravaganza.

The event has survived floods, lightning strikes and a gatecrashing crisis 10 years ago, which resulted in an estimated 200,000 people cramming on to Worthy Farm to set a record attendance.

Glastonbury has become a monster yet when the last drum roll has been sounded, the stages dismantled and 800 stalls selling everything from blankets to burgers cleared away, it reverts to a working farm.

Visit in late summer and the chances are you will spot a badger snuffling in the hedgerows. For that reason staging Glastonbury poses one of the biggest challenges in the entertainment business.

For the BBC too, which will be at Glastonbury in force, the festival is a military- style operation that will result in more than 40 hours of live radio and TV broadcasting.

That level of organisation is in stark contrast to the 1970 festival, which wasn’t happening at all until a group of travellers from Stonehenge arrived unexpectedly and threw it all together at the last minute. now nothing is left to chance.

An army of 34,000 workers including 400 first-aiders puts it all together. A huge 32-ton roller is used to flatten the uneven ground to prevent sprained ankles, while tractors fitted with magnets scour the site after- wards to scoop up hundreds of lost and discarded tent pegs which could harm wildlife. There are 20 bars, 300 showers and about 4,500 toilets.

This year the site has been ex- tended to cover almost 1,300 acres with a perimeter security fence stretching almost six miles.

The BBC will be taking almost 40 miles of cable and 47 cameras, while Glastonbury even has two underground, terrorist-proof reservoirs that can each hold one million litres of water.

“It is a balancing act because Glastonbury is both farm and festival,” says infrastructure manager Phil Miller.

“You can’t just concrete the place to make the job easier. I’m a laid back chap but from the beginning of May I do have sleepless nights with lists whirring through my head. Probably my worst nightmare is beyond my control: the weather.” The Glastonbury mud is the stuff of legends. In 2005 dinghies not wellies were the order of the day when two months of rain fell on the festival in a few hours.

The main stage, the Pyramid, was under a foot of water and power was lost. half a mile of pipes has since been installed to improve drainage but almost as bad can be a long, dry spell, which results in clouds of unbearable dust as lorries trundle in.

Although it is now possible to have a “Glastonbury-lite” experience by venturing in and out for performances, some 85,000 people will camp in the Worthy Farm grounds this year. Sewage must be collected each night, stored in a 750,000-gallon lagoon and taken away for disposal in hundreds of tankers. Scores of mobile telephones, unwittingly dropped down toilets, are first fished out.

The booking of bands is a round- the-year job but work begins in earnest to prepare the site in February. Only the main stage is permanent, the other nine have to be constructed from scratch, while it takes about a month to dismantle everything.

Power cuts are a disaster in waiting for any music festival so Glastonbury has both mains electricity and sufficient generators to supply a small town in the event of a failure.

Miller says that the 15-feet high security fence, which also spans the river that cuts the site almost in two, is impenetrable.

One of the low points in the festival’s history was the post-ponement of the 2001 event to give organisers time to react to the mass invasion by gatecrashers that had happened the previous year.

The BBC has been broadcasting from the festival since 1985 on radio, followed by television coverage in 1997. Mark Cooper, the corporation’s executive producer for television, hasn’t missed a festival since those first images were beamed to the nation’s living rooms.

This year more than 16million viewers will tune in to watch the festival on three BBC channels, plus there is online coverage.

“It’s the mother of all festivals,” says Cooper. “In terms of television coverage Glastonbury has become the biggest music event in the world but we started with just eight hours on BBC2.”

This year across the BBC network, including online and on the interactive red button, there will be 157 hours of live and recorded coverage.

Its army of workers will get through 80 pints of milk and 10 tins of biscuits each day. Like Miller, Cooper fears the elements the most. Past BBC coverage has been threatened by 60mph winds and countless torrential downpours.

“At times the weather has been biblical,” says Cooper. “I can remember John Peel standing under an umbrella

in 2005 saying: ‘It’s the end of the world’. Our position was near a stream that had burst its banks and we had to rebuild it in a completely different area. no equipment is weather-proof but so far we’ve never been forced off air.

That would be unthinkable.” Cooper’s own biggest personal disaster was forgetting his wellies one year but he says. “Communications are one of the biggest issues.

“In the early days there was no mobile phone signal at Glastonbury. even now when all the trucks are linked by intercom it’s often easier to walk to sort things out but try doing that in six inches of mud or worse. It’s slow and exhausting.”

In many respects Glastonbury, which this year runs between June 24 to 27, is even bigger than events such as the World Cup when the BBC can rely on feed from host broadcasters. At the festival every minute of coverage is self-generated.

Covering Glastonbury costs the BBC an estimated £1.5million. Paul Rodgers, editor of the BBC’s 6 Music, says:

“The festival is now part of our cultural heritage.

“For us, planning is now taking place almost all year round. If we don’t get the sound right there’s not much point in us being there.”

Both 6 Music and Radio 1 will have their own studios containing charts showing where every worker and piece of equipment is. Last year the corporation had to react to the unfortunate death of Michael Jackson, which forced a sudden change of plans as reporters were dispatched to every corner of the grounds to seek reaction from the stars.

“It’s a live event so it’s inevitable that some of our coverage is on the hoof but that is what makes it so exciting,” adds Rodgers.

“The worst possible case scenario for us would be a total technical blackout.” Plenty of spares are packed because popping out to the BBC storeroom or the shops for a replacement light bulb is not really an option at the festival.

Another problem for the BBC is securing agreement from the stars about how much of their set can be broadcast. In the past David Bowie and Rod Stewart have limited live coverage to a handful of songs.

Last year Bruce Springsteen topped the bill triumphantly with a two-and-half hour set which cost the organisers a £3,000 fine for breaking a midnight curfew.

Such is the lure of the festival that leading musicians and bands regularly agree to perform for a fraction of their normal fees. Residents in the nearby hamlets of Pilton, Pill and Sticklynch are generally a tolerant lot, although some are known to decamp for festival week, or they make a few bob by renting out their homes. Tradition- ally the villagers are given free tickets.

Despite all the meticulous planning the unexpected can and does happen. This year Glastonbury lost one of its headline acts, U2, after a back injury suffered by Bono forced the band’s late withdrawal. For Michael Eavis, the dairy farm owner and Glastonbury founder, it meant a frantic search for a replacement before Gorillaz stepped in.

There is barely a big band that hasn’t performed there but he has still to entice the Rolling Stones and Led Zeppelin to play. His daughter Emily, who works behind the scenes to arrange the line-up, says the main criterion for selection is stage presence.

“You need to be able to play a really good live set. We’re not bothered about how many records you’ve sold.”

They were initially told by Springsteen’s agent that they couldn’t afford him but the Boss relented after being sent a dossier about the festival’s history and donations to good causes.

The power of Glastonbury had worked its magic again.

The Cats of Riga
led tv
Image by A.Davey
Why are we in the Baltics? It’s all because of a TV program, "The Dogs of Riga." It’s a police procedural based on a book by Henning Mankell. After watching it, we found ourselves wondering what Riga is like. One thing led to another, and here we are!

So far, every cat we’ve seen in Riga has been black and white. This B&W puss was basking in the morning sun, a million miles away from everything, until we came along like a pack of paparazzi and interrupted her morning meditations. No wonder she looks miffed.

TV 2M

Some cool radio station images:

Echosmith 7/04/2014 #13

Image by jus10h
Echosmith performing live at Grand Park in downtown Los Angeles California on Friday July 4th, 2014. Part of the 2014 ALTimate 4th of July Block Party presented by Grand Park and L.A. radio station ALT 98.7 FM.

RIver 949

Image by linuslin
River 949, the local radio station in Ipswich.

25 Anos a Fazer Amor

Image by ines s.
Rádio Universidade de Coimbra
(RUC 107.9 FM in central Portugal)
www.ruc.pt
www.ruc.fm

«Radio Universidade de Coimbra (RUC) is the oldest running university radio station in Portugal, a freeform independent alternative radio station – both a radio-school and a local broadcaster in central Portugal (107.9 FM). All radio programs are author’s programs. This means that all compulsory playlists are banned by principle. The person hosting a radio program is entirely free to choose what music to play. As a result, there’s a multiple and eccletic offer of radio contents – programs ("shows") about pop, rock, electronic, dance, jazz, classical music, soundtracks, covers, portuguese music, japanese music, canadian music, chiptunes, hip hop, worldmusic, blues, rockabilly, chanson française, gothic, punk, krautrock, noise, experimental improvisations performed live, metal, medieval, exotica, mathematics, literature, cinema, ecology, science… »

Online broadcast: www.ruc.pt/emissao.php

Coimbra, Portugal, 04/2011

FMDallas


by .nate

Mahabaleshwar the highest hill station in the Western Ghats of Maharashtra in India , Mahabaleshwar is located approx 1372 meters around famous Lake Venna, Mahabaleshwar due to highest hills, Mahabaleshwar is Sanskrit for God of Great powerfulness. It was summer capital of Governor of the old Bombay Presidency. There are 30 wonderful valleys and beautiful viewpoints with panoramic vistas scattered around the hill station. its romantic and very pleasant for honeymooners.
There are also many viewpoints to see such like as Bombay point and Arthur’s point are the most famous, from Bombay point where the sea can see on a clear in day, and The Arthur’s point, which provides beautiful views of the Konkan coast .Mahabaleshwar is known for its one of the major attraction, its Venna lake has facilities for boating.The Britishers built various mansions, cottages and bungalows around the town, The place is famous with weekends lovers Climate of Mahabaleshwar. .
The whether of Mahabaleshwar is dry and pleasant and best in all the seasons, Mahabaleshwar has a moderate climate all through the year.
Summers are pleasant and temperature a minimum of 17C to a maximum of 28C. It is very pleasant and ideal for sight seeing. Time of summers is March to June
Monsoons time is good for visit here because average annual rainfall. Monsoon time of Mahableshwar June to September
Winters are very cool and the temperature minimum 5C to maximum 24C. perfect time for sight seeing .
Mahabaleshwar is highest hill station in the Western Ghats .
Accommodation in Mahabaleshwar
There are a number of
hotels in Mahabaleshwar where you can get food and accommodation for your weekends. Try to find stay in Mahabaleshwar with perfect location and picture view of hills which will make your stay more Wonderful. There are many of restaurants where you can taste local Veg, Non-Veg foods. Mahabaleshwar is finest place to visit near Mumbai or Pune. Mahabaleshwar is one of the famous Weekends Holidays spot in Maharashtra. TravelVacanza.com provides best hotels Mahabaleshwar at very reasonable cost and also offers an impressive and wide variety in order to provide a Budget and best accommodation to their guests. Mahabaleshwar is one of the quite expensive and beach destination and mostly travelers and honeymooners find Budget hotels in Mahabaleshwar with the perfect locations for feel nature very close .there are few Budget hotels in Mahabaleshwar which have been extend the finest services. . .

Book online budget Hotels at TravelVacanza.com. We offer Online hotels in Mahabaleshwar, Budget Hotels in Mahabaleshwar,Cheap Hotels in Mahabaleshwar at discounted prices. Find Best Hotel Deals.

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A few nice rhodes images I found:

Rhodes, Greece
rhodes
Image by AndreyFilippov.com
Rhodes, Greece

Rhodes, Greece
rhodes
Image by AndreyFilippov.com
Rhodes, Greece

Rhodes
rhodes
Image by Amy Windsor

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TV

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Some cool tv images:

TV
tv
Image by Apesod

tvs
tv
Image by ben.h

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News

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Check out these news images:

News
news
Image by Dr John2005

Broken News
news
Image by ahockley
Clark County has around 400,000 residents, and the local newspaper thinks the major local story is the list of construction projects

News
news
Image by S/L

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Gestione Economica e Valutazione degli investimenti in stalla – Parma 11/01/2018
Event on 2018-01-11 09:00:00
Hai sotto controllo l’economia della tua attività giorno per giorno? Scopri come gestire in modo efficace la situazione economica dell’azienda da latte. Gestione economica e valutazione degli investimenti è il corso che ti consente di apprendere concretamente le tecniche e le conoscenze economiche per valutare opportunamente il reale beneficio degli investimenti. Spesso risulta difficile capire quale sia l’andamento economico effettivo dell’attività. È consuetudine verificarlo quando ormai è troppo tardi e le decisioni sono state già prese ed attuate. Partecipando a questo corso di Formazione, farai un percorso guidato grazie al quale comprenderai:  Come operare strategicamente le scelte economiche; Come conoscere e gestire le informazioni produttive che arrivano dalla stalla; La valutazione e l’utilizzo ottimale dei fattori della produzione; Gli strumenti economici dell’azienda; I 4 step per prendere le decisioni corrette; Le 3 tipologie di decisioni aziendali; Il ciclo del management; L’analisi SWOT.  

at Parma
Via Emilia Ovest 281/A
Parma, Italy

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