Only Drinks

Drinks and Cocktails guides and resources

Browsing Posts published by Rosita Farrell

Fortune Feimster
Event on 2017-11-11 21:00:00

at Hyenas Dallas
5321 East Mockingbird
Dallas, United States

FMDallas

Carnegie Hall Family Concert: Peter and the Wolf and Other Stories
Event on 2017-10-14 14:00:00
The Orchestra of St. Luke’s returns to Carnegie Hall with three fantastic family-friendly stories for orchestra and narrator. Prokofiev’s classic Peter and the Wolf is performed alongside two new compositions: Caroline Shaw’s adaptation of The Mountain That Loved a Bird by Alice McLerran, commissioned by Carnegie Hall, and Robert Xavier Rodriguez’s take on a favorite children’s book, The Dot and the Line by Norton Juster, co-commissioned by Carnegie Hall and the Dallas Symphony Orchestra.

at Carnegie Hall
881 Seventh Avenue
New York, United States

FMDallas

Leading SAFe® 4.5 Training – Dallas
Event on 2017-11-13 09:00:00
Course Summary In this two-day course, attendees will gain the knowledge necessary to lead an enterprise Agile transformation by leveraging the Scaled Agile Framework® 4.5 and its underlying principles of lean thinking and product development flow. This course will enable you to leave with an understanding of how the principles and practices of the Framework support Lean-Agile Programs, Scaling Agile, Lean-Agile Program Portfolio Management, and Scaling Leadership. Whether at the team, program or portfolio level, attendees will be able to explain and implement the practices necessary to achieve business and technical alignment and consistent, sustainable delivery of value. SAFe® is a registered trademark of Scaled Agile, Inc. Introduction This course is available in the following formats: Publicly, across the United States Privately, on-site for your organization Please contact us to inquire about scheduling this course for your organization. Course Benefits Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to: Apply lean, Agile and product development flow principles to improve productivity, employee engagement, time to market and product quality. Understand how to leverage the Scaled Agile Framework to implement and scale a consistent Agile approach across multiple teams, departments and programs. Maintain consistent alignment and sustainable delivery of business strategy from the top of the organization down to the development and delivery teams, managing the delivery plan approach at the Portfolio, Program and Team levels. Understand the roles and related skills necessary to scale Agile across the enterprise and how each of these roles work together to create a cohesive delivery strategy that maximizes delivery efficiency and overall product value. Gain valuable insights into the leadership skills that are most effective in unlocking the intrinsic motivation of software development knowledge workers, then learn how to apply these proven practices in your unique organization. Prerequisites This course (and certification program) is designed for leaders, managers, and change agents that are responsible for leading a Lean|Agile transformation based on the Scaled Agile Framework® (SAFe®). There are no required prerequisites for this course, however participants may find the following experience useful before attending the class: Introduction to Agile, or equivalent knowledge Agile Bootcamp, or hands-on Agile experience The following individuals may be interested in this course: Managers, Directors & VPs Program & Project Managers Enterprise Architects Release Managers and more…

at Dallas, Texas, United States
Dallas, Texas, United States
Dallas, United States

FMDallas

Check out these casablanca images:

Casablanca
casablanca
Image by Ant??hony
Mohammed V boulevard, a frequent light rail system and space that feels excellent with the humid weather, cool sea breeze and shade.
The Eid al-Fitr public holidays were likely keeping the streets empty and a great way to get around the city without distractions and hawkers.

ISO100 f8 1/100 50mm LR

Hotel Casablanca, Morocco
casablanca
Image by Arthur Chapman
Hotel Casablanca, Casablanca, Morocco. Photographed on 23 October 2014.

©© Arthur Chapman and Audrey Bendus.

Casablanca
casablanca
Image by rwoan

TV 2M

A few nice live news images I found:

Family living in derelict building – Managua, Nicaragua
live news
Image by Robert Croma
1987

The huge earthquake that struck Managua in 1972 left between 5000 and 10,000 dead. The core of the city was flattened. When I was there in 1987 a large area of the city’s centre still hadn’t been rebuilt. Overgrown swathes of land and derelict, half destroyed buildings was the view not far from the Intercontinental Hotel (one of the few central buildings, incidentally, to survive the quake intact).

A number of extremely poor families were living in the shells of the remaining buildings without electricity, sanitation or water.

Just over 46.% (2005 est.) of Nicaraguans presently live below the national poverty line.

GM3_8297.JPG
live news
Image by BostonCatholic
JERUSALEM (April 15, 2013) – Cardinal Seán and a group of 29 priests of the Archdiocese of Boston have traveled on an Easter pilgrimage to the Holy Land this week, and they’re bringing the readers of TheGoodCatholicLife.com blog along with them.

On the last day of their pilgrimage, the pilgrims began by walking the Via Dolorosa, the Way of the Cross, the path through the streets of Jerusalem that Jesus walked with the Cross to the Crucifixion. After celebrating Mass, they thanked those who had taken care of them on their pilgrimage and prepared for their flights home. As they waited, news of the bombings at the Boston Marathon back home reached the pilgrims and they united themselves in prayer with those who were hurt, their families, and the emergency workers who rushed to care for them.

All this week, our colleague George Martell is traveling with the pilgrimage, embedded with the Cardinal and his priests so we can bring you photos, blogs, videos, and audio reports from the Holy Land from the pilgrims at such places as the Basilica of the Annunciation, Mount Carmel, the Sea of Galilee, the Church of the Transfiguration, Qumran, the Mount of Olives, the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, the Upper Room, and more. This is a once in a lifetime opportunity to walk in the footsteps of Jesus with Cardinal Seán and the Archdiocese’s priests as an Easter retreat experience.

Please stay tuned to www.thegoodcatholiclife.com, as well as www.BostonCatholicPhotos.com and www.YouTube.com/BostonCatholic and our Facebook Page at www.facebook.com/bostoncatholic and Twitter account: www.twitter.com/bostoncatholic for the latest updates from the Holy Land.

(Photo credit: George Martell/TheGoodCatholicLife.com) This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License. creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/3.0/)

TV 2M

Some cool african songs images:

Horse Hitching posts in the Garden District . Tie up your horse here.
african songs
Image by denisbin
Horse hitching posts in the Garden dIstrict of New Orleans.

Some geography of New Orleans. The location and geography of New Orleans is unique in America. Most of the city is well below sea level, except for the French Quarter which was built on a natural levee of the river in the 1700s. As the city has expanded special levees, pumps and flood gates have been erected around the city. When Hurricane Katrina struck in 2005 the storm itself did damage to New Orleans but the major devastation came from the levees failing and water flooding at least 80% of the city area. It is useful to remember that 50% of New Orleans city is water and not land! Its location on the banks of the mighty Mississippi River, near the delta bayous and swamps was the raison d’être for the city. It was to control all navigation and commercial activity on the river and to provide a safe harbour as close as possible to the Gulf of Mexico. Because of its strategic location it has always been the prize for invaders during wars. The city has a tropical climate and the regions north of the city along the banks of the Mississippi were and are major sugar plantation areas, not cotton plantation areas. You have to travel upstate in Louisiana to find the cotton growing areas. This tropical climate along one of the world’s major water courses meant until recently that the area was plagued with Yellow Fever, malaria and other deadly illnesses. To the north and east of the city is Lake Pontchartrain, a huge body of water; in fact the city is bordered by water on three sides. By road the mouth of the Mississippi is over 100 miles away but this is because the river follows a circuitous route to the mouth of its delta. The city metropolitan area has a population of 1.1 million, exactly the same as the population of Adelaide. Although the population fell after Hurricane Katrina the population is now 90% of what is was before the hurricane. There is little evidence of flood damage in the areas that we will see as tourists. The French Quarter was not flooded because the founding French settlers sensibly chose a high site for their city.

Some early history of New Orleans. The city was founded in 1718 by the French Mississippi Company, a major trader in furs bought from the Indians up river. They got the local Indians, the Chitimacha to cede land to them. The Company named the city after the Duke of Orleans who was the Regent of France at that time. After the French Wars between the Indians, British, French and Spanish in America from 1756-63 the French ceded New Orleans to the Spanish. The Spanish held New Orleans from 1763 to 1801 when Napoleon defeated the Spanish and New Orleans and its territories to the west were returned to France. As Napoleon needed more funds to continue his Napoleonic Wars with Britain and others he soon (in 1803) sold New Orleans and all territories west of the Mississippi to President Jefferson for the small sum of million. West Florida, New Orleans and the west comprised over 800,000 square miles! The Louisiana Purchase covered – Arkansas, Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, Nth & Sth Dakota, Oklahoma & parts of Texas and Wyoming.

When the French settled New Orleans they built a trading port city of wooden buildings on the high ground along the banks of the Mississippi. The streets were named after the royal houses of France and Catholic saints, hence Bourbon Street after the Dukes of Bourbon, not the whisky. Local pine was the timber used for building the houses, often on brick pylons to raise the houses above any possible flood threat. The compact town was destroyed by two major fires during the Spanish ownership of Louisiana in 1788 and again in 1794. The city was rebuilt in brick, with wrought iron balconies in the Spanish style usually with central courtyards. So most of what we see today in the French Quarter or Vieux Carré is actually of Spanish design and from the era of Spanish building in the late 1790s. So the French Quarter is really the Spanish Quarter and the Spanish buildings include the three major public buildings of this era- the Cathedral of St. Louis, and the adjoining Cabildo and Presbytere. The first St. Louis Cathedral was built in 1781; the second in 1725; and the third in 1789. That third structure in Spanish style was almost totally rebuilt in 1850 in the style of the previous cathedral.

The Strategic Importance of New Orleans. Not long after the Americans bought New Orleans a major war broke out between England and her former American colonies. War raged from 1812-14 when the British, amongst other achievements, sailed up the Potomac River in Washington and burnt down the White House and attacked the national capital. As the port that controlled the Mississippi and the river system that went up to the British colonies in Canada the British wanted to retake New Orleans. A young American officer, Andrew Jackson (later President Andrew Jackson) led the American forces in a battle with the British. The battle of New Orleans (remember the hit song about it in 1959?) took place in January 1815. It was the final battle of the War of 1812 and despite bad odds Andrew Jackson and the Americans prevailed and won the battle. Hence the main square in New Orleans is Jackson Square with a fine statue of the later President on horseback is in the centre of the square. And again during the Civil War both the Confederates and Unionists wanted to control New Orleans. During the Antebellum period New Orleans had been a major port for the slave trade and the major slave auction centre of the American South. Louisiana declared their secession from the Union in January 1861 and the Confederates bolstered their occupation of the area. It was the link to the South’s cotton plantations up the Mississippi River Valley and its link across the Mississippi to the wealthy states of Texas, Arkansas and some secessionist counties of Missouri. The first shots were fired at Fort Sumter in April 1861. New Orleans was blockaded by the North in May 1861 showing what an important prize the city was to the Union. After two short battles in April 1862 the Union forces occupied New Orleans and split the Confederacy into two parts as it then controlled the Mississippi River too.

The Creole Culture of New Orleans. Creole culture in Louisiana is still strong. Creoles are primarily the people descended from the early French and Spanish settlers mixed with later German immigrants and African slaves. Creoles were originally white Europeans but the term later included mixed race people. When the Haitian Revolution led by slaves erupted in 1804 many French residents fled from Haiti to New Orleans with their African slaves. They reinforced the French culture of New Orleans and established their three tiered society of white Creoles, mixed race Creoles and black slaves. The mixed race Creoles were mainly fee black people and added to the free black population of New Orleans. French speakers dominated in New Orleans until 1830. But as late as 1900, 25% of residents spoke French and 75% could understand it. (250,000 Louisianans still speak French at home today.) Half the schools in New Orleans taught in French until the Civil War. In 1862 the Union occupier of the city General Butler abolished French instruction and enforced English teaching. The War made New Orleans an American city. But the Creoles did not disappear. They continued to dominate society for some time. The Creole planters along the Mississippi lived on their plantations during the hot malaria filled summers but moved to their French Quarter town houses for the cool winters. (It was the reverse in Charleston where the planters lived in Charleston in the hot summers and spent winters on their plantations.) The New Orleans winter was the time for balls and parties and the celebrations around Lent and the Mardi Gras activities, which still persist as a reminder of the French heritage of the city. The white French Creoles also often took black slave women as mistresses but unlike the white Americans they tended to give freedom to the children born from these unions. Thus New Orleans ended up with the largest number of free blacks of any Southern city in the Antebellum days. Mixed race Creoles had their own society balls and functions. Many had property and were quite wealthy in their own rights because of grants from their white Creole fathers. But their access to political and legal rights disappeared during the Jim Crow era as white Americans applied their white-black caste system on all parts of America including Louisiana. Free persons of colour were discriminated against by the Jim Crow regulations and segregation in New Orleans too. Change came with of the Civil Rights era.

Image taken from page 399 of ‘Under the African Sun: a description of native races in Uganda, sporting adventures, and other experiences … With 134 illustrations from photographs by the author and two coloured plates’
african songs
Image by The British Library
Image taken from:

Title: "Under the African Sun: a description of native races in Uganda, sporting adventures, and other experiences … With 134 illustrations from photographs by the author and two coloured plates"
Author: ANSORGE, William John.
Shelfmark: "British Library HMNTS 10094.f.7."
Page: 399
Place of Publishing: London
Date of Publishing: 1899
Publisher: William Heinemann
Issuance: monographic
Identifier: 000092900

Explore:
Find this item in the British Library catalogue, ‘Explore’.
Open the page in the British Library’s itemViewer (page image 399)
Download the PDF for this book Image found on book scan 399 (NB not a pagenumber)Download the OCR-derived text for this volume: (plain text) or (json)

Click here to see all the illustrations in this book and click here to browse other illustrations published in books in the same year.

Order a higher quality version from here.

Assumption of Responsibility Ceremony – CSM Bronson – United States Army Africa – 090807
african songs
Image by US Army Africa
www.usaraf.army.mil

United States Army Africa
Assumption of Responsibility Ceremony

Command Sergeant Major Gary J. Bronson
7 August 2009

Hoekstra Field, Caserma Ederle, Vicenza, Italy

Cleared for public release. The images are generally considered in the public domain. Request that credit be given to the U.S. Army and individual photographer.

To learn more about U.S. Army Africa visit our official website at www.usaraf.army.mil

Official Twitter Feed: www.twitter.com/usarmyafrica

Official YouTube video channel: www.youtube.com/usarmyafrica

U.S. Army photos by Edward N. Johnson, U.S. Army Africa, PAO

TV 2M

Video Association of Dallas Memberships
Event on 2017-12-31 23:45:00

at Video Association of Dallas
4329 Belmont Ave
Dallas, United States

FMDallas

A few nice morocco images I found:

Agadirian chic
morocco
Image by mhobl
February 2012
the writing on the hill means: God, King, Fatherland

on explore

COLORS & MUSIC
morocco
Image by fabiogis50
PhotoAwardsCounter
Click here to see the awards count for this photo. (?)

TV 2M

Some cool morocco tv images:

Earth Information Day at COP22
morocco tv
Image by World Meteorological Organization
Earth Information Day at COP22

Earth Information Day at COP22
morocco tv
Image by World Meteorological Organization
Earth Information Day at COP22

TV 2M

Arturo’s Art & Me: August 2017: Beautiful Batiks
Event on 2017-08-09 11:00:00
Arturo’s Art & Me is a class for 3-5 year olds and their favorite adult. Adults and young children listen to a story, look at works of art, and play hands-on games in the Museum galleries before creating an original work of art in the Art Studio. Adults and younger siblings do not need a ticket. When classes are filled, e-mail lhanson@DMA.org to be placed on the waiting list. Public – .00 DMA Member – .00

at Dallas Museum of Art
1717 N Harwood
Dallas, United States

FMDallas