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Drinks and Cocktails guides and resources

Cocktail coasters are used for more than just protecting your coffee table from rings and stains they are used to promote businesses, services, and causes of all sorts. Many people also have custom cocktail coasters made up to celebrate something like an anniversary or a wedding. They are an amusing type of business card that is also quite practical.

Cocktail coasters (http://www.thirstycoasters.com/servlet/-strse-Hope%20For%20The%20Cure/Categories) come in all kinds of materials. The diversity of materials is quite amazing. They have come a long way since they were made only out of wood. One of the most familiar materials is glossy board. These are heat resistant because they are covered with a glossy coating. You can print anything on this type of coaster – even a photograph. These come in square shapes or round cut out shapes. You can even get them in the shape of stars.

Another old standby is the cork coaster. These are cheap, classic and are usually small cut out circles. The advertisement is usually sealed on to the cork in some way. They can also be made out of thin rubber and the promotional message can be stamped on it. These are sometimes called no slip coasters.

Another popular type of coaster is the promotional 3D aluminum coaster. These are made of gold, silver or copper and are very cheap. They come in all kinds of shapes including round or circular as well. These can be quite elegant and classy looking.

Leather coasters can also be quite elegant looking especially if you want to stamp or print them with some type of seal. The seal is usually in gold or silver printing. You can also usually get these in all kinds of different colors as well with black and green being the most popular.

Even more elegant are the promotional ceramic coasters. These are round white coasters that will last a long time. They make a good gift because they do not get ruined easily so if you want the message on your coaster to persist then choose the porcelain materials.

A more casual choice is PVC. These are floppy non stick coasters that have an image or message imprinted on them. They also usually last a very long time and are easy to clean. Be careful not to spill alcohol on these types of beverage coasters (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pSoAwLgfwn0) as that can lead to the imprint sliding off. You can get these in many different colors as well. Gold imprints look good on a dark PVC coaster.

If you really want a unique look then try for coasters that are made from see through acrylic. These can be etched with the logo that you have in mind or you can have your logo or business card sandwiched in between layers of acrylic. The insert can be printed in full color and the effect can be very impressive.

Most promotional companies can give you the very latest graphic computer technology in order to make these coasters look as professional as possible. They do not cost a lot and they are a good way to get your word out about your business.

Sarah Martin is a freelance marketing writer based out of San Diego, CA. She specializes in international cuisine, fine wine, and travel. For a great selection of beverage coasters and cocktail coasters, please visit http://www.thirstycoasters.com/index.html.

Ireland is famous for many things and one of the most notable and tasty is its sublime blended and malt whiskies.

Distilling Irish whiskey is a lengthy complicated process that cannot to be rushed if you want to produce the best. In fact the Irish are so proud of their distilling methods that they love showing the world how it’s done. So, if you are planning to visit Dublin make sure you put a trip to at least one of the many distilleries in the region on your itinerary.

The best distillery to visit is the Old Jameson, where the tour costs offer an amazing insight into the whiskey maker’s art. Here you will witness all the stages of distilling from mashing to bottling, and get a total appreciation of what is involved in the centuries-old distiller’s art. Make no mistake, this is not just a visit, this is a condensed seminar at the end of which you will have acquired a new-found knowledge of how to tell the difference between whiskies. You will also find out all about John Jameson – the man who started it all. Tours are offered seven days a week, from 9.00 a.m. until 5.30 p.m. all year, including bank holidays with the exception of a few days at Christmas.

The next best place to visit is the home of Bushmills, the stunning aged single malt that you will find served in all luxury hotels in Dublin. However, you will need to leave the city and head three and a half hours north to Old Jameson’s sister distillery at Old Bushmills. Since 1608 this top Northern Ireland distillery has been responsible for producing not only the Bushmills single blends that carry the distillery’s name, but also contributing whiskey to the marvelous Jameson brand. A trip to the distillery also provides the perfect excuse for an overnight stay at the nearby Antrim coast and a look at the Giant’s Causeway.

However, if you do take the tour at Old Bushmills make sure you volunteer for the taste test at the end; the highlight of the tour. In order to demonstrate the differences between Irish and Scotch whiskies, participants sample young scotches right through to aged, single Irish malts, detailing the transition from the peaty Scotch taste to the smooth triple-distilled Irish alternative. It is a superb condensed education for the palate and for real whiskey lovers – not to be missed!

Paul Buchanan writes for a digital marketing agency. This article has been commissioned by a client of said agency. This article is not designed to promote, but should be considered professional content.

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Image taken on 2006-05-14 17:14:18 by paulaloe.

Private label beverages

The human strength is based on his ability to be unique and special. Every one has individual ideas, attitudes, character and way of thinking, view of beauty, style and taste. These qualities speed up the process of human race development they separate us from animals. We cooperate in groups with people who have similarities with us and use our differences to achieve results.
These main principles of life are the key idea for MyDrink project. We think that Globalization of the 20th century, where brands like Coca-Cola, Nike, McDonalds and so on grew strong is over. They attracted customers from different groups and communities to the same principles and ways of thinking and were very successful, but their customers are evolving and today we notice that people return back to their identity, search for something closer to their individual attitude and refuse to be like everyone else, a person today and tomorrow choose to be the one and only and has courage not only to show their similarities to other group members but to express their differences as well.
MyDrink is looking forward to the beverage business of the 21st century and has created the best possible product brand ever! No Brand or the brand that you create for yourself! We have developed technical possibilities to create a drink for every individual desire. We know that everyone knows best what product would be attractive for himself and his group of friends, relatives or simply people with similar interests and we made it possible for everyone to create their unique beverage.
The idea of Individualization seems to bring up many doubts, but we explained why there should be no fear for this natural turn of life:

* Popular brands like Coca-Cola represent the product I know, trust and like.

A customer of 21st century is already intelligent enough to recognize the product quality and select natural and healthy products without paying attention to their global popularity. Mydrink produce and import only highest quality drinks and a small note next to ingredient list symbolize that we sell only best drinks in the world, and you create best brand in the world to suit the product.

* There are already too many different products on the shelves for me to choose

Products on the shelves always change. Better products and ideas change the old ones. It is the way of evolution.

* Global brands are cheaper because of mass production

Technology is developing fast all the time and now production facilities avoid old and static machinery. Mydrink has the possibility to create flexible quantities at competitive prices.

* Global brands are everywhere and you can select the product you know

Since the birth of history people used to travel around the world searching for something new and learning from other exceptional experiences and knowledge. If you will try only global products and pay attention to global brands you will miss the main idea of visiting different places!

* Individual brands are temporary

They are temporary as the fashion, local and global interests, social situation and almost everything in our life today, so you can adapt to every item every time.

Nothing is here forever except the main principles of nature and we must adapt to them. We are created to be exceptional and unique, our differences help us to evolve to new levels, to achieve more than we have ever expected and to look forward to achieving even more! So let us all individualize!

IM Marketer has been building and marketing websites for several years ideally suited to marketing affiliate programs. Starting out with blogs and then looking directly at websites and the heavy use of SEO. So if it’s about IM marketing it would be a good idea to check out his thoughts.


Does milk really do a body good? In this shocking video, you will discover what milk really is and what it does to an otherwise healthy person. For more information, please visit: www.thebestdayever.com

Now I love wines and wine tastings, but this economy has put a bit of a dent in my wine purchasing of late.  (Did I mention that I’m a rather fast drinker?).  Husband is, and always has been, a cocktail man.  Thus, he’s also a damn good bartender.  He is a firm believer in fresh juices, simple syrups, and appropriate condiments (pearl onions, cucumbers, mint, etc.) and a staunch nay-sayer of anything what screams “mixer”.

And much like I like to keep a few bottles of wines around for when guests are over, so my husband likes to keep the fixings for his favorite standard:  The Collins.  Easy and versatile, this delicious quaff is incredibly affordable AND simple to make.  Easy as you need so few ingredients; versatile because you can go beyond the gin and vodka collins and offer your friends bourbon collins, rum collins, tequila collins….You get the picture.

Step 1.  Purchase a very inexpensive bottom-shelf bottle of gin, vodka, what beckons you.  I don’t recommend the VERY bottom of the shelf, but any of those imbibements in the $16-18 price range are gonna do just fine for mixing.  At those prices, you could get three or four spirits. Your guests – and you – have options!

Step 2.  Make the simple syrup.  Simply boil 1 cup water in a small saucepan; when it comes to a boil add 1 cup sugar; stir until all the sugar is dissolved; turn off stove; let cool.  Voila!  So Easy!

Step 3.  Juicing some lemons.  This next step does require a bit of equipment – a juicer.  Now, Husband’s choice of juicers is definitely a higher end one (don’t even ask what it cost!).  And this juicer is great for juicing a lot of lemons or limes (or orange juice) at a time to keep in the fridge.  But for cocktails on the go (read: to order), the standard hand juicer does just fine.  The number of guests you are expecting will help to determine how many lemons you should juice.  Be sure and shop around a bit, though, and find the best price!  Citrus can be expensive.  (You’ll only use a tablespoon per drink, if this helps with the spending money on lemons).

Fill a collins glass with ice

Add 2 ounces gin/vodka/bourbon/whathaveyou

Add 1 Tablespoon simple syrup

Add 1 Tablespoon fresh squeezed lemon juice

Top off with soda water, stir (I use a chopstick), and serve.

You can toast me somewhere between the second or third sip!

Salud.

Jenny Park works at The Wine School of Philadelphia


Its really hard to hear the words Charlie Murphy and not say them in the Dave-Chappelle-as-Rick-James voice. But once you start chatting with him, hes actually a really cool dude.


Nancy Whiskey From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Nancy Whiskey (b Anne Alexandra Young Wilson, Bridgeton, Glasgow, Scotland, 4 March 1935 — d 1 February 2003) was a Scottish folk singer, best known for the 1957 hit song “Freight Train”. While attending art school in Glasgow, Anne Wilson performed on the local folk club circuit where she met fellow singer and guitarist Jimmie macgregor who introduced her to blues and hillbilly music. She took her stage name from a folk song which had a chorus of “Whiskey, whiskey, Nancy, whiskey”. She was signed to Topic Records and moved to London in 1955. Although reluctant to surrender her reputation as a solo performer, she was persuaded to join the Chas mcdevitt Skiffle Group to record Elizabeth Cotten’s song “Freight Train”. The record made the UK top five in 1957, and she also toured the USA with mcdevitt’s group. After a second, smaller hit, “Greenback Dollar”, Whiskey left the group to resume a solo career and marry musician Bob Kelly, who became a member of her backing group, the Teetotallers. By the 1970s, she had largely retired from music.

Many online spirits websites are seeing the benefits of marketing cocktails online to consumers as the at home trend of cocktail making is growing at an accelerated pace. Five years ago many online retailers ignored the cocktail opportunity as they saw no commercial online gain. This has however changed drastically.

Cocktail making in the on trade has grown tremendously led by the Mojito, the Caipirinha and the Godfather. It is classic cocktails that are driving the growth as people have travelled to Cuba, Brazil and the USA. Big branded manufacturers and the London bar scene have pushed cocktails through education in bar. Mixologists now offer courses on how to make cocktails for popular work team building exercises.

Five years ago consumers did not know Mojito’s had rum in and were born in Cuba and the Caipirinha was a product of Brazil and made from cachaca, but know they do and they are keen to make them at home. This has created online spirits opportunities as companies like the Purveyor and the Drinkshop have comprehensive cocktail guides so consumers can make cocktails at home.

This Christmas though we believe online spirits sales will be driven through online gin, online vodka and online rum with online bourbons being a close fourth. The reason is each online spirit has a classic signature drink such as a gin and tonic over ice with a squeezed lime wedge or rum and cola over ice with a squeezed lime wedge. Each spirit is also linked to amazing cocktail creation. If you take online rum for instance the online spirits consumer can make a mojito, a daiquiri, a Mai Tai or a classic Havana Libre and therefore with one bottle of rum create different cocktails for all their guests. Brands such as Hendricks and Sipsmith gin have created extensive cocktail lists for consumers to experiment with their brands thus discovering new tastes at home. The bartenders secrets have been exposed online and supermarkets tend to stock many of the natural ingredients that turn the online cocktails into ontrade cocktails thus encouraging trial at home.

There is also two more trends that are encouraging cocktail at home creation. The first is the growth of the cocktail guides as presents at Christmas. This trend has grown steadily as distribution of cocktail guides has grown from specialist retailers into mainstream. The second trend is the growth of cocktail shakers and cocktail equipment which is obviously important as without the correct tools these great cocktails online cannot be created.

This Christmas should therefore be the best Christmas ever for online cocktail making with all the above trends coming together. If we however look to the future we see some interesting online spirit developments. We believe online spirits merchants will offer more functionality online to help people make better cocktails at home. This will be through video, search, buy all ingredients buttons and other downloadable applications.
If the UK can reach only 20% of the at home cocktail making of the USA then cocktail making is set to grow by over 160%.

The Purveyor is a retailer of fine wines, online spirits & online champagnes. At the Purveyor you can cocktails in 6 bottle or 12 bottle cases or as a single gift. Contacts For interviews, images or comments contact: Scott Lenik Sales and Marketing Director Email: scott@thepurveyor.com

  • ISBN13: 9781416596653
  • Condition: USED – VERY GOOD
  • Notes:

Product Description

What better way to learn about wine than to taste it?

Hailed by Jerry Shriver in USA Today as “the woman who makes the wine world gulp when she speaks,” Jancis Robinson created in How to Taste a classic for connoisseurs of all levels and the first introduction of its kind to focus on practical tasting exercises. Now fully revised and updated, Robinson’s renowned guide proves once again that learning about wine can be just as engaging as drinking it.

Written in Robinson’s trademark accessible style, the new How to Taste features thoroughly updated vintages and producers as well as up-and-coming wine regions and styles. Incorporating wines that are both easily obtainable and reasonably priced, Robinson’s lessons are separated into complementary portions of theory and practice to help you both learn and taste your way to wine expertise.

One of the world’s best-loved authorities on wine, Robinson explains first how to get the most out of the flavor of your wine and food, and then about specific grapes and the wines themselves. By the time you finish the book, you will have learned how to recognize the most popular grape varieties from Chardonnay and Riesling to Pinot Noir and Cabernet Sauvignon, and why a good sparkling wine is always better than cheap champagne. You will discover how to judge sweetness, acidity, and fruitiness as well as the difference between the length and the weight of a wine. You will also be given practical advice for dealing with wine in the real world: how to choose from a wine list, organize your own wine tastings, and pair wines with specific foods.

From the armchair to the wine shop and back to the table, How to Taste will transform anyone on any level into a confident connoisseur who can leave faltering sips behind and have fun along the way.Amazon.com Review
Whether Montessori or Merlot, kindergarten or Cabernet, the importance of a good instructor during the formative years is crucial. That’s why newcomers to the world of wine could do a lot worse than having a corkscrew in one hand and a copy of Jancis Robinson’s How to Taste in the other. A revision of 1983’s Masterglass and published in the U.K. under the superior title Jancis Robinson’s Wine-Tasting Workbook, How to Taste is a primer by a certified Master of Wine and star of the PBS series Jancis Robinson’s Wine Course. From acidity to Australian Shiraz, oak to Oregon Pinot, Robinson delivers chapters of information and theory, intermingled with shaded “Practice” exercises, presented in a style as off-dry as one of the author’s beloved Rieslings (the tannin in a lesser vintage Barolo is “like sucking on a matchstick”). Sometimes tuition at Jancis U. runs high: the lesson on sugar/acid balance culminates with expensive Sauterne “Practice.” And even if Robinson risks, by dropping words like “charred” and “umami” early in the book, sending novices back to tear open a fresh box of Franzia, vinous virgins are encouraged to stick with it. By the time they get to the glossary at book’s end, they’ll be identifying wines at blind tastings with professional accuracy–which, Robinson encouragingly reveals, and she ought to know, is about 50 percent. –Tony Mason

How to Taste: A Guide to Enjoying Wine